Lifestyle

Alexander Plath is not only the beloved PM-International host on stage during our biggest events, he’s also part of the IMM trainings, and has a coaching agency for appearance, impression, and presentation. A couple of weeks before the biggest PM-International event, the World Management Congress in Frankfurt/Main, he freed up his busy schedule to answer the questions we always wanted to ask him.

Alexander, you’re a motivational coach for over 15 years now. What made you help others being successful?

That’s an interesting question. I don’t actually see myself as a motivational coach. I see myself much more as an instructor and coach for appearance and personal impact. That means that I help people show themselves what’s in them and what they are capable of, following the motto “making performance visible”. I started with this when I noticed that there are so many people out there that don’t succeed in showing their true strength. I found the purpose of my life through network marketing. If there is something as a calling, then mine is to be an instructor and coach.

How did you manage to become this successful?

I don’t think there is the one way to be successful. I certainly seized opportunities when they arose and without direct sales I wouldn’t be where I am today. I faced a lot of situations where I had to take bold decisions and leave things behind me or act against the opinions of others. To me, success is a repetition of the right things and therefore it is also hard work. Having found my hobbyhorse in neurology has certainly helped me further in my activity as instructor and coach. In the end, success also means communicating, working, and living a brain-friendly life. There are two sides – your own brain, where the keyword “motivation” play a big role – and the brains of your peers, in who’s brains I wish to transport my message in a way for their brains to remember it for as long possbile.

What was the most difficult moment of your career and how did you manage to overcome it?

I don’t believe that there was the one big difficult moment, but there surely were some challenging situations. One of them was breaking to my parents that I decided to go full-time network marketing after my studies. They were shocked about my decision, after studying industrial engineering for years. Today they are very happy about me being so successful in direct sales. Overall, even until recently, these past years there definitely have been some critical moments where I had to ask myself if what I was doing was really the right thing for me. But especially, if I was the right person for what I was doing. I like to say: “Direct sales (and life itself) is like riding a bike. As long as you keep pedalling, you won’t tip over. Sometimes you’ll go faster, sometimes you’ll go slower but you’re always moving forward.

What fascinates you about direct sales?

Direct Sales gives me the opportunity to act out all of my talents. Realising that I can inspire others and show them how they too can inspire others. That’s why direct sales is a great tool for everybody who wants to find out what they really want in life. Of course, making money is an important part of this, but isn’t money just a tool too, that helps you to better focus on those things that really make you happy in life?

What skills do you need to become successful in direct sales?

One of the most important skills to have in direct sales is stamina. Like I mention earlier, it is all about continuing to pedal when it gets tough. You also need to be open to personal growth, otherwise your ego will take over and other people will have a hard time working with you. And working with others, and not against others, is crucial in direct sales. Additionally there has to be a willingness to learn and to work.

What advise do you have for people considering to get on direct sales?

The most important advise I can give, is to find a product they are truly passionate about. I’m not a huge fan of just using the products as a tool to make money. Furthermore, you should set a personal time laps (e.g. 6 months or 1 year) and to give it all at full throttle until the deadline. After the deadline you should reconsider if the business is really working for you or not. Obviously, it is advisable to listen and learn as much as possible from the partnering company. This will save you a lot of frustration. Ultimately, do not listen to people who have no experience and no idea of direct sales. Everybody knows somebody who knows somebody who lost a ton of money with direct sales. But if you dig a little deeper, those are mostly biased opinions, rather than facts. Many people don’t want to take responsibility for their own actions and tend to blame others for their own failures. I think that is one of the reasons why there is so much scepticism towards direct sales, without taking into account all the opportunities this unique business model offer.

Thank you Alexander, that was quite interesting. See you soon on our World Management Congress in the “Jahrhunderthalle” in Frankfurt/Main in Germany.

— Would you like to share your experience and tips with our readers? Leave a comment here on our blog! —

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